Archive for December, 2008

The End Of A Year, A Visit To Fry’s … and Goals

Posted in Uncategorized on December 31, 2008 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
1890.I think that I’m kind of starting from zero again, in a way. I’m back on a capable computer, which I got by with a little help from my friends, and I’m looking forward.

If my life was a poem, it would be “Finnegan, begin again”. I always seem to be.

Anyway, I’m taking it as a positive sign. And now I look forward. Kris Coppieters has purchased my services, and I’m getting started on this with the new year, and the way I see it, designing someone’s logo is a great way to start. It was what I was meant to do. It’s why I keep looking for the opportunity, because there is no other option for me.

Looking over the Macintoshes on sale at Fry’s tonight, I saw what I hope will be the future of my tools. I got back on the PowerMac G4 after a bit of begging. I’ll work toward the MacPro/MacBook Pro/whichever by earning this.

Until then, the G4 will serve well. But there is only so far she can take me.

Welcome 2009. You’ve got to be a better deal than 2008 was.

Technorati Tags: , ,

Powered by ScribeFire.

The End Of A Year, A Visit To Fry’s … and Goals

Posted in Uncategorized on December 31, 2008 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
1890.I think that I’m kind of starting from zero again, in a way. I’m back on a capable computer, which I got by with a little help from my friends, and I’m looking forward.

If my life was a poem, it would be “Finnegan, begin again”. I always seem to be.

Anyway, I’m taking it as a positive sign. And now I look forward. Kris Coppieters has purchased my services, and I’m getting started on this with the new year, and the way I see it, designing someone’s logo is a great way to start. It was what I was meant to do. It’s why I keep looking for the opportunity, because there is no other option for me.

Looking over the Macintoshes on sale at Fry’s tonight, I saw what I hope will be the future of my tools. I got back on the PowerMac G4 after a bit of begging. I’ll work toward the MacPro/MacBook Pro/whichever by earning this.

Until then, the G4 will serve well. But there is only so far she can take me.

Welcome 2009. You’ve got to be a better deal than 2008 was.

Technorati Tags: , ,

Powered by ScribeFire.

A Snowy Calm, Just Before The Storm

Posted in pdx_photos on December 28, 2008 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
1889.A view of my favorite downtown in the world, with a dusting of snow … just before the big one hit last week:

Clicky here to embiggen.

Technorati Tags: , , , ,

Powered by ScribeFire.

A Snowy Calm, Just Before The Storm

Posted in pdx_photos on December 28, 2008 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
1889.A view of my favorite downtown in the world, with a dusting of snow … just before the big one hit last week:

Clicky here to embiggen.

Technorati Tags: , , , ,

Powered by ScribeFire.

A New Style of Portland Street Sign Debuts at 117th and Division?

Posted in pdx_blades, pdx_photos, Street Blade Gallery on December 28, 2008 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
1888.I believe I’ve stumbled onto something new and rather exciting, and it’s been rolled out on one street sign in my own neighborhood.

Recently I saw, on the north side of SE Division Street at 117th Avenue, the street blades you see here:

Interesting, yes? And just in this one spot so far.

This represents sort of a quantum leap in the design of the basic Portland street blade. But more about that in a ‘mo. Here’s a few more views.

They’ve added the crossing street block index! It’s now an integral part of the blade, and in a slightly surprising way.

Next:

It reads well from a distance. Nifty!

The avenue blade retains the traditional Portland look, now within the new white frame with rounded corners. It’s looking pretty good … and readable!

Here’s how it might look from a car. You know what corner you’re at.

Now, for a little design discussion.

One of the biggest drawbacks of the basic Portland street blade is the lack of a block number. Whether or not you get that the crossing street blade holds the block number of the street you’re one (the block number of the named street being self-evident from the number of the avenue), we take it as axiomatic that it’s just plain nifty to have the block number on the street sign itself, thus preserving your sanity and relieving you of the need to peer at the front doors of nearby houses, thus perhaps drawing reproachful return glares.

But in general it saves you a step. You have the block number at a convenient, findable place, and it’s finally been integrated into the design of the blade itself, just as it has in almost every other major city in the Willamette Valley. Currently, the block number comes on a tab bolted on to the blade itself, and, due to the ways you can have the blades stacked, not always in the same place. Moreover, several somewhat-poorly designed sign-toppers for neighborhood identification omit this information entirely, and the tab has been removed in some of these cases. This design neatly solves that problem.

Now the question becomes how efficiently the information gets delivered. We feel this design does the job quite nicely. By placing the directional (SE), specific (Division) and generic (St) all on the same baseline, the eye reads the street name at one go quite naturally. Reducing the type size on the generic preserves the traditional Portland look. And, by placing the block number a bit up and toward the upper right hand corner of the blade, the eye arrives at an important supplemental bit of information last.

On top of all that is the sheer niftiness of giving the blade a new rounded-corner profile with a wide white stroke around the outside actually contains and defines the design into an aesthetically pleasing whole.

I don’t know who in the Portland department of making street signs came up with this idea, but my friend … you’ve nailed it.

Beautifully done.

Please make sure you get more of these up. You make me proud to be a Portlander.

Technorati Tags: , , , ,

Powered by ScribeFire.

A New Style of Portland Street Sign Debuts at 117th and Division?

Posted in pdx_blades, pdx_photos, Street Blade Gallery on December 28, 2008 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
1888.I believe I’ve stumbled onto something new and rather exciting, and it’s been rolled out on one street sign in my own neighborhood.

Recently I saw, on the north side of SE Division Street at 117th Avenue, the street blades you see here:

Interesting, yes? And just in this one spot so far.

This represents sort of a quantum leap in the design of the basic Portland street blade. But more about that in a ‘mo. Here’s a few more views.

They’ve added the crossing street block index! It’s now an integral part of the blade, and in a slightly surprising way.

Next:

It reads well from a distance. Nifty!

The avenue blade retains the traditional Portland look, now within the new white frame with rounded corners. It’s looking pretty good … and readable!

Here’s how it might look from a car. You know what corner you’re at.

Now, for a little design discussion.

One of the biggest drawbacks of the basic Portland street blade is the lack of a block number. Whether or not you get that the crossing street blade holds the block number of the street you’re one (the block number of the named street being self-evident from the number of the avenue), we take it as axiomatic that it’s just plain nifty to have the block number on the street sign itself, thus preserving your sanity and relieving you of the need to peer at the front doors of nearby houses, thus perhaps drawing reproachful return glares.

But in general it saves you a step. You have the block number at a convenient, findable place, and it’s finally been integrated into the design of the blade itself, just as it has in almost every other major city in the Willamette Valley. Currently, the block number comes on a tab bolted on to the blade itself, and, due to the ways you can have the blades stacked, not always in the same place. Moreover, several somewhat-poorly designed sign-toppers for neighborhood identification omit this information entirely, and the tab has been removed in some of these cases. This design neatly solves that problem.

Now the question becomes how efficiently the information gets delivered. We feel this design does the job quite nicely. By placing the directional (SE), specific (Division) and generic (St) all on the same baseline, the eye reads the street name at one go quite naturally. Reducing the type size on the generic preserves the traditional Portland look. And, by placing the block number a bit up and toward the upper right hand corner of the blade, the eye arrives at an important supplemental bit of information last.

On top of all that is the sheer niftiness of giving the blade a new rounded-corner profile with a wide white stroke around the outside actually contains and defines the design into an aesthetically pleasing whole.

I don’t know who in the Portland department of making street signs came up with this idea, but my friend … you’ve nailed it.

Beautifully done.

Please make sure you get more of these up. You make me proud to be a Portlander.

Technorati Tags: , , , ,

Powered by ScribeFire.

A Christmas Gift To All … Wallpaper For Your Root Account Desktop

Posted in bloggage, Computer Repair Zen, design, ZehnKatzen on December 25, 2008 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
1887.Now, we who have Un*x-based systems (OS X and others) know that occaisionally need to get a root account enabled because sometimes you just have to do a superuser thing or two. I occaisionally need to grab files from another account but you can’t always do that when just logged in with Administrator priviledges.

But you know how dangerous root access can be. You can delete all files from your system, and the system will go ahead and let you.

I like doing this … this wallpaper lets you know exactly what kind of fire you’re playin’ with when you go root. I give this idea to the general public and urge everyone who has a root account on any sort of Un*x to put it up there. Enjoy:

Merry Christmas!

Technorati Tags: , , ,

Powered by ScribeFire.