Archive for January, 2009

Atrios Seems Impressed

Posted in pdx_transit on January 31, 2009 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
1935.Atrios, eternal source of inspiration and one of The Great Bloggers, notes the opening of WES.

Approves of the WiFi.

Hopefully the economy will improve to the point where I can afford a device that will can take advantage of it (why should everyone else have all the fun?).

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Atrios Seems Impressed

Posted in pdx_transit on January 31, 2009 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
1935.Atrios, eternal source of inspiration and one of The Great Bloggers, notes the opening of WES.

Approves of the WiFi.

Hopefully the economy will improve to the point where I can afford a device that will can take advantage of it (why should everyone else have all the fun?).

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R-E-S-P-E-C-T, or Aretha Franklin’s Hat Spotted in PDX (updated)

Posted in liff in PDX, memes on January 29, 2009 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
1934.

And I just realized, as much as I enjoy Kimberly, Tony, Joe, and Matt, there’s one person who needs a touch of class more than most, and who are we to deny him?

It is, as some acquaintances might say, fabulous!

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R-E-S-P-E-C-T, or Aretha Franklin’s Hat Spotted in PDX (updated)

Posted in liff in PDX, memes on January 29, 2009 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
1934.

And I just realized, as much as I enjoy Kimberly, Tony, Joe, and Matt, there’s one person who needs a touch of class more than most, and who are we to deny him?

It is, as some acquaintances might say, fabulous!

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The Treachery Of Images, 2009 PDX Version

Posted in modren_liff, pdx_politik, photoshoppery, satire, semiotics on January 29, 2009 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
1933.The world famous Magritte painting, The Treachery of Images, painted by the Surrealist master in 1929, made a statement about mapping meanings to objects. It, in case you haven’t seen it (you actually have, if you don’t think you have, you’re just about to realize it), it depicts an unremarkable pipe (the kind you smoke tobacco in) with the legend in cursive beneath “Cece n’est pas une pipe” – this is not a pipe.

It teaches a lesson on meaning. As Magritte himself is said to have said:

The famous pipe. How people reproached me for it! And yet, could you stuff my pipe? No, it’s just a representation, is it not? So if I had written on my picture ‘This is a pipe,’ I’d have been lying!

In the spirit I interpret coming from the great Surrealist (who also happens to be my favorite 20th Century artist) I provide what to me is a sign of the times:

Given the disucssion above, you can see this works no matter what POV you have. If you think Sam should resign, then the image explains itself. If you enjoy the play of semiotics, then you know that this is not a Mayor … it’s just an image of one, it can’t vote or attend City Council meetings or fib about dating an 18-year-old when he should have known better, and it can never redeem itself or earn forgiveness, and you can make that observation whether or not you care about whether or not he resigns or continues.

And if you really like meta, the message can be that the news coverage about the situation may not be the true story of the situation at all (I wonder if we’ll ever know).

So, as the master might have said about this, “The famous Mayor … how people have reproached me for it! But can you elect it to office? No, it is just a representation, is it not? If I had written on my picture ‘This is a mayor,’ I’d have been lying!”

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The Treachery Of Images, 2009 PDX Version

Posted in modren_liff, pdx_politik, photoshoppery, satire, semiotics on January 29, 2009 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
1933.The world famous Magritte painting, The Treachery of Images, painted by the Surrealist master in 1929, made a statement about mapping meanings to objects. It, in case you haven’t seen it (you actually have, if you don’t think you have, you’re just about to realize it), it depicts an unremarkable pipe (the kind you smoke tobacco in) with the legend in cursive beneath “Cece n’est pas une pipe” – this is not a pipe.

It teaches a lesson on meaning. As Magritte himself is said to have said:

The famous pipe. How people reproached me for it! And yet, could you stuff my pipe? No, it’s just a representation, is it not? So if I had written on my picture ‘This is a pipe,’ I’d have been lying!

In the spirit I interpret coming from the great Surrealist (who also happens to be my favorite 20th Century artist) I provide what to me is a sign of the times:

Given the disucssion above, you can see this works no matter what POV you have. If you think Sam should resign, then the image explains itself. If you enjoy the play of semiotics, then you know that this is not a Mayor … it’s just an image of one, it can’t vote or attend City Council meetings or fib about dating an 18-year-old when he should have known better, and it can never redeem itself or earn forgiveness, and you can make that observation whether or not you care about whether or not he resigns or continues.

And if you really like meta, the message can be that the news coverage about the situation may not be the true story of the situation at all (I wonder if we’ll ever know).

So, as the master might have said about this, “The famous Mayor … how people have reproached me for it! But can you elect it to office? No, it is just a representation, is it not? If I had written on my picture ‘This is a mayor,’ I’d have been lying!”

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The New Look Of Portland Street Blades Comes To 57th And Division

Posted in pdx_photos, Sign Design, Street Blade Gallery on January 28, 2009 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
1932.We can now be more sure we’ve detected a trend.

Back on 28 December, in posting #1888, we shared a happy discovery we found at the corner of SE 117th Ave and Division Street, in our humble neighborhood. It looked like this:

(go to this posting to see the other images, and the design discussion on it) We were quite excited about it at the time … the design of Portland’s street blades is something we think has been a long time in coming. The breakthrough was in the large, clear format which still had that “Portland” look to it, and most importantly, includes the crossing street block number as an integral part of the design, which is a boon to people trying to find an address.

Well, coming east on SE Division Street a few days ago, we spotted another example of this sign in the Franklin High School area, specifically, SE 57th and Division:

That building in the background there is Atkinson Elementary School. But is this not nifty? Here’s a view of the Division Street blade:

The “2400” block index on the sign isn’t an error by the way. Between SE 42nd Avenue and SE 82nd Avenue, Division Street jogs a half-block to the north to become the 24th street south of Burnside, therefore the 2400 block. The 2500 block is defined by a little street called SE Windsor Court, which exists in a few fragments one block south of Division in that area. Everywhere else, it’s 2500.

The numbered avenue blade also fowards the design we saw on SE 117th Avenue:

As you can see on the right there is one of the MetroFi WiFi antennas. Kind of a set here: the street blade is your tax dollars at work, the WiFi antenna is your tax dollars at rest. Oh, were do I find the wit for these things?

But it’s not just the north side of the street that gets the new blades. It’s on the south side too:

It’s nice and visible even at the kinda-crappy resolution of my awesome plastic fantastic.

For those of me who obsess about these things, this is a big signal. One new set of street blades at a street corner out near 122nd and Division could just be a test. Three new sets … including a completely-signed intersection on both sides of the street … indicate that this may indeed be the new design for Portland’s street blades.

It’s intriguing that they’ve so far done two intersections that so happen to be on Division Street.

And this design is a good one, as I’ve said before. I don’t know who came up with this look, but, seriously, you’ve hit it out of the park, yo.

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