Archive for October, 2009

[address_nerd] New Seattle Street Blades, And PNW Address Nerds Unite!

Posted in Address Nerd, Street Blade Gallery, street blades, Street Sign Gallery on October 31, 2009 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis

2251.Benjamin Lukoff, a Seattleite with whom I’m fortuned to occiasionally communiciate with, has an article up on Crosscut.com about the Seattle street blades which are being gradually rolled out, coincidentally at more-or-less the same time Portland’s are undergoing a gradual change.

The observation is particularly fun because, just as the leaves are going from green to brown, so are the the Seattle street blades:

Photo from Benjamin Lukoff’s flickr stream here

Actually, not all of the Seattle blades are brown, just the ones on Seattle’s network of Olmstead boulevards, those city-spanning parkway blvds like Ravenna Blvd or (as above) Lake Washington Blvd and Interlaken Blvd that were inspired by the Olmstead Brothers’ park plan for Seattle.

Ben points out that this change has been in the works for a while:

Yet it turns out that we approved this project in 2006 as part of the Bridging the Gap levy. Since then we’ve begun replacing signs at all our nearly 13,000 intersections, as the aluminum ones installed in the 1960s have definitely begun to show their age, and the new fiberglass batch is larger and more reflective. In a sense, we’re finally catching up with the rest of the country. Our timing may not have been perfect, but we’d better pray for strong stomachs, because this project is scheduled to go, according to a report in The Seattle Times, until 2016. (On the bright side, that leaves plenty of time for you to pick up your favorite old sign at the city’s surplus warehouse.

The material appears to be the same that we here in PDX are seeing going up on our new street blades.

The new Seattle design not only includes a design for streets and roads but also for pedestrian stairways and paths that happen to be in the streets right-of-way and trails (such as the Burke-Gilman Trail), with a walking-man pictogram similar to the ones we see on our walk-signals. Very nifty.

Ben does point out that, as I’ve seen in Portland, some mistakes are obtaining. No misspellings yet, but directionals are being left off and some signs are a little inscrutable.

It is becoming apparent that Clearview, the font, is catching on all over. Seattle’s signs are using it too, and the reputation of mixed-case type is being forewarded thereon.

The real gem is that Ben links two other of us Address Nerd (or sign-obsessives, if you will). The other one is one whom I’ve enjoyed, Morgan Wick; the other is, of course, my own self. It made my day when I saw he linked me to the work “odd”, which made me laugh out loud.

Address nerds go viral? Maybe. And here I thought I was the only one, when I started. Nifty.

Ben’s full flickr stream is here. Also very nifty. Don’t miss the “Gently Used Kids Sale” while you’re at it. That Seattle – so inscrutable.

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[address_nerd] New Seattle Street Blades, And PNW Address Nerds Unite!

Posted in Address Nerd, All About Me, Sign Design, Street Blade Gallery, street blades on October 29, 2009 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
2251.Benjamin Lukoff, a Seattleite with whom I’m fortuned to occiasionally communiciate with, has an article up on Crosscut.com about the Seattle street blades which are being gradually rolled out, coincidentally at more-or-less the same time Portland’s are undergoing a gradual change.

The observation is particularly fun because, just as the leaves are going from green to brown, so are the the Seattle street blades:

Actually, not all of the Seattle blades are brown, just the ones on Seattle’s network of Olmstead boulevards, those city-spanning parkway blvds like Ravenna Blvd or (as above) Lake Washington Blvd and Interlaken Blvd that were inspired by the Olmstead Brothers’ park plan for Seattle.

Ben points out that this change has been in the works for a while:

Yet it turns out that we approved this project in 2006 as part of the Bridging the Gap levy. Since then we’ve begun replacing signs at all our nearly 13,000 intersections, as the aluminum ones installed in the 1960s have definitely begun to show their age, and the new fiberglass batch is larger and more reflective. In a sense, we’re finally catching up with the rest of the country. Our timing may not have been perfect, but we’d better pray for strong stomachs, because this project is scheduled to go, according to a report in The Seattle Times, until 2016. (On the bright side, that leaves plenty of time for you to pick up your favorite old sign at the city’s surplus warehouse.

The material appears to be the same that we here in PDX are seeing going up on our new street blades.

The new Seattle design not only includes a design for streets and roads but also for pedestrian stairways and paths that happen to be in the streets right-of-way and trails (such as the Burke-Gilman Trail), with a walking-man pictogram similar to the ones we see on our walk-signals. Very nifty.

Ben does point out that, as I’ve seen in Portland, some mistakes are obtaining. No misspellings yet, but directionals are being left off and some signs are a little inscrutable.

It is becoming apparent that Clearview, the font, is catching on all over. Seattle’s signs are using it too, and the reputation of mixed-case type is being forewarded thereon.

The real gem is that Ben links two other of us Address Nerd (or sign-obsessives, if you will). The other one is one whom I’ve enjoyed, Morgan Wick; the other is, of course, my own self. It made my day when I saw he linked me to the work “odd”, which made me laugh out loud.

Address nerds go viral? Maybe. And here I thought I was the only one, when I started. Nifty.

Ben’s full flickr stream is here. Also very nifty. Don’t miss the “Gently Used Kids Sale” while you’re at it. That Seattle – so inscrutable.

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[art] Drawing Comics With Doug TenNapel

Posted in art, art materials, artists, comic artists, comics, Drawing on October 28, 2009 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis

2250.Doug TenNapel gave you Earthworm Jim and GEAR, and now he gives you about ten minutes or so of his time to show you how he does what he does and talk about storytelling:

What is interesting about TenNapel is, with just about everybody (up to and including Scott McCloud and Scott Adams) using graphics tablets to get the job done, TenNapel kicks it old-school – at the drawing board, inking in pencilled panels on Bristol board using Sumi-e ink.

His remarks about using a Cintiq (for which I would kill everyone’s grandparents to own) versus drawing to complete a story were insightful and revealing. He draws for the same reason a lot of us draw. Drawing is, amongst other things, sensual as well as sensuous. The adjectives he use approach carnal; the feeling of laying down graphite and ink on paper is indeed seductive. While telling the story is part of what feeds his head, unless he’s actually drawing the drawings and filling them in with brush and ink, it’s kind of empty. There’s a decided lack of kinesthesia there; and while computers can make comic artists mad efficient and productive, there’s a decided feeling of separation from one’s work.

In the excellent Making Comics, Scott McCloud mentions a moment when he went out, bought a two-dollar (plus tax – the man lives in California, I do believe) roller ball pen, a Pilot Precise (the only pen worth owning) V7 (I prefer V5, but that’s just me) and dashes off a sketch with it, making the point that if you really want to draw comics, computers may be the bomb and heaven for you, but you can do it with a scrap of paper and a pen off the shelf.

If you want.

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[art] Drawing Comics With Doug TenNapel

Posted in art, design, Drawing, how to draw on October 28, 2009 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
2250.Doug TenNapel gave you Earthworm Jim and GEAR, and now he gives you about ten minutes or so of his time to show you how he does what he does and talk about storytelling:

What is interesting about TenNapel is, with just about everybody (up to and including Scott McCloud and Scott Adams) using graphics tablets to get the job done, TenNapel kicks it old-school – at the drawing board, inking in pencilled panels on Bristol board using Sumi-e ink.

His remarks about using a Cintiq (for which I would kill everyone’s grandparents to own) versus drawing to complete a story were insightful and revealing. He draws for the same reason a lot of us draw. Drawing is, amongst other things, sensual as well as sensuous. The adjectives he use approach carnal; the feeling of laying down graphite and ink on paper is indeed seductive. While telling the story is part of what feeds his head, unless he’s actually drawing the drawings and filling them in with brush and ink, it’s kind of empty. There’s a decided lack of kinesthesia there; and while computers can make comic artists mad efficient and productive, there’s a decided feeling of separation from one’s work.

In the excellent Making Comics, Scott McCloud mentions a moment when he went out, bought a two-dollar (plus tax – the man lives in California, I do believe) roller ball pen, a Pilot Precise (the only pen worth owning) V7 (I prefer V5, but that’s just me) and dashes off a sketch with it, making the point that if you really want to draw comics, computers may be the bomb and heaven for you, but you can do it with a scrap of paper and a pen off the shelf.

If you want.

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[liff] Neologism Of The Day: Hangoversight

Posted in liff, Stuff that doesn't fit anywhere else, Teh Funnay on October 27, 2009 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis

2249.Another new work for y’alls:

hangoversight (n): The factfinding process a drinker puts themselves through analyzing (as best as they can) the things they might have done to prevent the horrible way they feel the morning after the night before. Assaying and measuring the dog that bit you regardless of the hair that it grows.

“Man, Gina really tied one on last night, but after a bit of hangoversight she decided that next time, there will be no mixing that tequila and that rum. Bad mojo on her part!”

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[liff] Neologism Of The Day: Hangoversight

Posted in liff, Stuff that does't fit anywhere else, Teh Funnay on October 27, 2009 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
2249.Another new work for y’alls:

hangoversight (n): The factfinding process a drinker puts themselves through analyzing (as best as they can) the things they might have done to prevent the horrible way they feel the morning after the night before. Assaying and measuring the dog that bit you regardless of the hair that it grows.

“Man, Gina really tied one on last night, but after a bit of hangoversight she decided that next time, there will be no mixing that tequila and that rum. Bad mojo on her part!”

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[liff] Neologism Of The Day: Oopsienounce

Posted in All About Me, art, liff on October 26, 2009 by Samuel John Klein Portlandiensis
2248.New word for y’alls, and one what I just camed up with:

Oopsienounce (v.t.): to accidentally let slip that something was going to happen before you meant to announce it, or to admit inadvertantly that you know something that you were trying to keep under wraps. The loose lip sinking the ship. Portmanteau of oopsie and announce. Noun version: oopsienouncement.

Ex. 1: When New York Times publisher Bill Keller spoke on the future of the Times as a visual medium, he oopsienounced that Apple has the debut of a tablet Macintosh impending.

Ex. 2: Kari Chisholm of Blue Oregon noted today that GOP Gubernatorial hopeful has oopsienounced his campaign in advance of its anticipated late-September debut.

You’re welcome, Noosphere.

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